Flash flood warning after heavy rain

Following weeks of unusually dry weather leading to drought conditions in many parts of the country, the UK now seems to be moving from one extreme to the other with a bout of heavy rain prompting flood warnings.

The Environment Agency yesterday (April 25th) had flood warnings in place in 42 areas of England with some parts of the region seeing up to 50mm of rainfall on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning.

The agency also warned that further heavy rain forecast for the end of the week could lead to localised flooding in the north-west, the Midlands and Wales.

According to experts, the recent drought increases the risk of flooding in affected areas because the dry, compact soil is less able to absorb water.

With the substantial risk to property posed by flooding, the news could prompt buy-to-let owners to make sure they have extensive landlord insurance in place to make sure they are adequately protected.

They may also want to consider taking out landlord emergency insurance to ensure any damage to essentials such as the power supply or heating and drainage system is repaired as quickly as possible.

Meanwhile, the Electrical Safety Council (ESC) has issued a warning to property owners who are affected by flooding, urging them to consider electrical safety issues before they begin any clean-up or repairs.

“Water and electricity are a lethal combination,” said the ESC’s Penny Walshe.

“It may not immediately spring to mind when you are faced with the catastrophe of a flood in your home, but make sure that electrical safety is a priority before you try to do any clearing up.”

The organisation advises property owners to contact their supplier to turn off the electricity supply after a flood and avoid touching any sources of electricity, such as switches or appliances, when standing in flood water.  

You should always use a professional to carry out any repairs, says the ESC, and consider having an Electrical Installation Condition Report carried out on the property to check the condition of the electrical wiring after a flood.